Cinnamon Toast Crunch Brunch Cake

Cinnamon Toast Crunch cereal-infused cake with crunchy praline buttercream for a Christmas brunch!

Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cake Recipe

I had the honour of chatting with our British nanny the other day about traditional English Christmas desserts. She asked if I'd ever made Fruit Cake before, and I nearly laughed. I'm not sure when fruit cake turned into bricks of the most undesirable treat at the dessert table or why they have such a bad reputation, but traditional English Fruit Cake is likely very different than the inedible stuff I saw stacked up at the grocery store last week.

Emily, our lovely nanny straight from London, explained to me how she used to start a batch of fruit cake months before Christmas day. Every few days you poke holes in the top of a dried fruit-filled loaf, feed it sherry, and then flip it over until the sherry completely soaks into the cake. This cycle repeats itself for a month or two until it's ready to become a dense doorstop, I mean, dessert.  Just kidding guys!  I am sure it's lovely.  I wouldn't really know, but I am definitely intrigued and think maybe I should give it a shot next October...

And then there's Christmas pudding, which seems pretty far from any custard that I've ever had. Much unlike any sort of pudding that comes from a box, this is a steamed cake loaded (again) with dried fruit and tons of booze. Emily told me how she would make pudding with her grandmother, each one of the grandkids getting a chance to stir the batter and make a wish. A coin was then hidden in the in the batter to bring luck to whomever found it about three months later.  Yes, 3 months!!  Again with the booze and the soaking, Emily told me her grandmother would store her Christmas puddings in the cupboard months in advance. 

Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cake Recipe
Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cake Recipe
Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cake Recipe

Cake for breakfast, anyone?  This cake is basically the opposite of those traditional English desserts that Emily described. It takes minutes, in comparison, to bake and comes together even faster with the use of one of my favorite store-bough cereals: Cinnamon Toast Crunch. Oh yes, you read that correctly. I've turned a tasty breakfast cereal into a brunch-time treat! The cake is baked with Cinnamon Toast Crunch infused milk that makes it taste just like the cereal. For the frosting, I wanted more than just added cinnamon and cereal topping, so I create a Cinnamon Toast Crunch praline buttercream. Mind-blowing, I tell you.

Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cake Recipe

Using a standard praline base of sugar, water, and cream of tartar, I cooked it all up until golden before quickly stirring in the cereal and spreading it to cool. On its own, the Cinnamon Toast Crunch praline is pretty delicious and could be used as a garnish on your cake.  But to turn it into a buttercream, the praline needs to be ground down in a food processor until it is nearly a powder. The caramelized sugar can be quite hard, so you will need to make sure to grind, grind, grind to keep your guests' teeth from chipping. Who knew a boxed cereal could be transformed into something to really celebrate with?!?

Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cake Recipe

Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cake Recipe
Makes one, four-layer 8-inch round cake; Serves 12 to 16

For the cinnamon cake:
1 3/4  cups milk
1 heaping cup Cinnamon Toast Crunch cereal

3 cups + 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 cup unsalted butter, softened
2 cups granulated sugar
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
4 large eggs
1 1/2 cup cereal milk

In a large pitcher of bowl, combine the milk and cereal. Carefully weight the cereal down by fitting a bowl or plate on the surface the milk. Let steep for 20 to 30 minutes. When done, strain out the infused milk using a mesh sieve. Gently press down on the cereal with a rubber spatula to release any excess milk. Measure out 1 1/2 cups of milk and set aside. 

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Grease and flour two, 8-inch cake pans and set aside. 

Sift together the dry ingredients and set aside.

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (or a large bowl using a hand mixer), mix the butter on medium until smooth.  Add in the sugar and continue to mix until light and fluffy, 3 to 5 minutes.  With the mixer on low, add in the vanilla and the eggs, one at a time. Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl.

With the mixer on low, carefully add in half of the dry ingredients. Stream in the milk and mix until combined. Carefully add in the remaining dry ingredients and mix on medium for no more than 30 seconds after the last streaks of flour are combined.

Evenly distribute the batter between the two pans. Bake in the preheated oven for 3o to 35 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cakes comes out clean. Let the cakes cool on a wire rack for 10 to 20 minutes before removing the cakes from their pans.

For the Cinnamon Toast Crunch Praline:
1 cup granulated sugar
1/3 cup water
pinch cream of tartar
2 cups Cinnamon Toast Crunch cereal
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Like a baking sheet with parchment or a silicone baking mat and set aside.

Place the sugar, water, and cream of tartar in a small saucepan over high heat. Bring the mixture to a boil and continue to cook, without stirring, until the mixture turns a medium amber color. Remove the saucepan from the heat and quickly stir in the cereal and cinnamon. Tip the mixture onto the prepared pan and quickly spread it into a thin layer with a greased spatula. Allow the praline to completely cool then break into pieces.

For the Cinnamon Toast Crunch Praline Buttercream:
1 1/2 cups finely crushed praline
1/2 teaspoons cinnamon, or to taste
double batch Swiss meringue buttercream

Break the cooled praline in small enough pieces to fit in the bowl of a food processor. Grind the praline into a powder and set aside.

Mix the buttercream until silky smooth. Remove about 2 1/2 cups of buttercream and set aside. 

Stir 1 cup praline and cinnamon into the remaining buttercream.

Assemble the cake:
Once the cakes are cool, carefully cut them in half horizontally with a long, serrated knife to create four, even layers. Place one layer of cake on a cake board or serving dish. Spread on 1 cup of praline buttercream. Top with the next layer of cake and repeat. Crumb coat the cake with the buttercream and chill in the refrigerator for 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, use a mesh sieve to sift any large bits out of the remaining praline. Stir the praline powder into the reserved buttercream. This buttercream will be smoother for frosting the outer layer of the cake. 

Smoothly frost the chilled cake with the buttercream. Fill a piping bag fitted with a start tip with any remaining buttercream and pipe swirls around the top of the cake.

 

This post was sponsored by Life Made Delicious. Thoughts and words are all my own. Thank you for supporting the brands that make Style Sweet CA possible.


 

Pear Dulce de Leche Cake Recipe

Tender Pear Cake filled and frosted with a caramel-like Dulce de Leche Buttercream and bits of oat crumble.

Pear cake with dulce de leche buttercream recipe

Canadian Thanksgiving was over a month ago, but that can't seem to keep my overwhelming feelings of thanks and gratitude away.  As the holidays approach, the days grow darker, and the rainy weather keeps us huddled together inside, I can't help but reflect on lucky I am to be surrounded by love, family, and lots of baked goods.  So when our family friend and editor-in-cheif of Risen Magazine asked if I'd share my story, I didn't hesitate to agree.

In the "Expressions" section of the latest issue, you will find my full creative journey.  From ballet lessons to baby bottles, I discuss my motivations for starting my own cake business to trying to do it all as a working mom to ultimately leaning on a bit of faith that these big, life-changing decisions I've made along the way were the right ones for our little family.  Cake design has been my major creative outlet over the past decade, my way of expressing my fears, doubts, joys, and triumphs.  Worry blocks creativity, so I've been trying my best to be more patient, a little less controlling, and to embrace the imperfections in life.  

Pear cake with dulce de leche buttercream recipe

This Pear Cake is slightly adapted from my book Layered.  The shredded pears nearly melt into the cake and keep it incredibly soft and tender. Adding Dulce de Leche to homemade buttercream is so luxurious.  Similar to caramel, the dulce de leche adds a deeper, not-as-sweet creaminess to the frosting.  Making dulce de leche from a can of sweetened condensed milk is super simple, but you may also try a store-bought variety.  

For an additional layer of texture, I added an Oat Crumble in the middle.  The cake is so moist and the buttercream so silky, I really feel like this cake benefits from a bit of crunch.  The oat crumble recipe will certainly make more than you need, so sprinkle leftovers over yogurt or roasted fruit!

Tessa Huff and family

Happy Thanksgiving!!

Pear Dulce de Leche Cake Recipe

For the cake:
2 ½ cup all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
½ teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon cardamom (optional)
3 medium pears, such as Bartlett
½ cup vegetable or canola oil
 ¼ cup granulated sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 large eggs
½ cup buttermilk

Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees.  Grease and flour two 8-inch cake pans and set aside.

Sift together the flour, baking powder, cinnamon, baking soda, salt, and cardamom (if using) and set aside.  Peal the pears and shred the pears (a box grater works great here) and place in a mesh sieve (or a few paper towels) over a bowl to drain.  If they are extra juicy, press down gently with a rubber spatula to release some of the excess liquid (or gently bundle them up and squeeze the paper towels).  Set aside.

Using an eclectic mixer, beat together the oil and sugar until combined.  Add in the vanilla and then the eggs, one at a time.  Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl.

Add in half of the flour mixture and mix on low until combined.  Slowly stream in the buttermilk until incorporated.  Add in the remaining flour and mix until mostly combined.  Stop the mixer and fold in the drained shredded pears

Evenly divide the batter between the two pans and bake in the pre-heated oven for 25 to 28 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cakes comes out clean.  Cool on a wire rack for about 20 minutes before removing the cakes from their pans.  Allow cakes to cool completely before frosting.

 

For the buttercream:
2/3 cup prepared or store-bought Dulce de Leche (recipe to follow)
Small batch Swiss Meringue Buttercream

Mix the buttercream until silky smooth.  Add in the Dulce de Leche and mix until fully combined.

 

For the oat crumble (optional):
¼ cup brown sugar
¼ cup all-purpose flour
½ teaspoon cinnamon
pinch salt
6 tablespoons unsalted butter, diced and softened
½ cup rolled oats

Pre-heat oven to 325 degrees.

Place all of the ingredients in a medium mixing bowl.  Stir together with a wooden spoon or rubber spatula until the mixture forms small clumps of what looks like “wet sand.”  Dump the contents on a lined baking sheet and spread out.  Bake for 8 to 12 minutes (stirring halfway) until the crumble starts to crisp and turn slightly golden brown.  Cool on a wire rack then break up into small pieces (if the pieces are left large, then the cake will be difficult to slice).

 

For the Dulce de Leche:
1 can sweetened condensed milk

Place an unopened can of sweetened condensed milk in a slow-cooker.  Fill with enough water to full submerge the can.  Turn the slow-cooker to “low” and cook for 8 hours.  Very carefully remove the can from the hot water and let it cool at room temperature.  Open the can and store the Dulce de Leche in an air-tight container in the refrigerator. 


Assembly:
Place a cooled cake on a cake board or serving dish.  Spread on about 1 cup of buttercream with an offset spatula or the back of a spoon.  Sprinkle on a generous amount of oat crumble and top with the second layer of cake.  Frost the cake with the buttercream and decorate as desired.

For the boarder, fill a piping bag fitted with a petal tip (Wilton #104), and pipe interlocking "V's" around the top and bottom edges of the cake. Keep the narrow end of the tip facing up as you pipe.

 

Source: https://www.stylesweetca.com

Overnight Eggnog Cinnamon Rolls with Orange-Vanilla Bean Glaze

Start these eggnog and nutmeg-spiced cinnamon rolls with toasted pecan filling the night before and add the orange-vanilla bean glaze just in time for Christmas brunch!

Over-night Eggnog Cinnamon Rolls with Orange Vanilla Glaze

I was 9 months pregnant the first time I hosted Christmas morning.  Admittedly, I wasn't thinking too clearly or logically by that point, and I decided to make homemade bagels from scratch for the first time. I wasn't very comfortable with yeasted doughs at the time, but I insisted on teaching myself one last new skills before Everett was born.  I ended up stressing entirely way too much over those lumpy rings of dough that some-what a bagel and haven't made them since...

Over the last few years, I've become a much more well versed in yeast-risen baked goods.  After experimenting with recipes like Lemon Brioche Pull-Apart Bread and Date Bourbon Buns, I better understand the simplicity of working with yeast and just how amazing homemade breakfast pastries taste still warm out of the oven.  Bonus points if you get to eat them still in your matching Chirstmas pj's.

One thing in particular that I've truly embraced with these types of recipes is the timing.  Want warm, gooey, sticky Eggnog Cinnamon Rolls come Christmas morning without having to wake up at 3am?  Start the dough the night before and make time on you side instead of impatiently waiting between rises. By placing the dough in the refrigerator to rise, you are essentially hitting “pause” in the process.  The cool temps in the fridge dramatically slow down the yeast, so the dough continues to rise but at a much slower pace.  Instead of scheduling 1 to 2 hours between steps, you can pop the dough into the refrigerator for 8 hours (or overnight) and continue on with your day/night, whether that be Christmas Eve or any other time of the year.

Over-night Eggnog Cinnamon Rolls with Orange Vanilla Glaze
Over-night Eggnog Cinnamon Rolls with Orange Vanilla Glaze
Over-night Eggnog Cinnamon Rolls with Orange Vanilla Glaze
Over-night Eggnog Cinnamon Rolls with Orange Vanilla Glaze

These Overnight Eggnog Cinnamon Rolls bake up beautifully in a French oven or cast iron skillet.  I find that they distribute heat very evenly and efficiently, creating perfectly risen buns with toasted edges and gooey centers. The puffy, pillowy dough is similar to a brioche dough and is loaded with lots of butter.  I've used eggnog as my liquid here, but you may use any type of milk in its place.  The eggnog flavors are quite subtle, so I like to add a pinch of nutmeg into the dough as well.  For a bit of crunch and texture, toasted pecans have been chopped and added to the cinnamon roll filling.

This cream cheese glaze has been my go-to accessory lately (you'll see it again on a couple more cake recipes coming up soon), so I decided to change it up by adding fresh orange juice, zest, and vanilla bean.  The bright yet subtle citrus notes pair perfectly with the nutmeg and cinnamon and nearly everything is better with a little vanilla bean.  Perfect along side a warm cup coffee and lots of Christmas cheer.

Over-night Eggnog Cinnamon Rolls with Orange Vanilla Glaze

Overnight Eggnog Cinnamon Rolls

1/2 cup eggnog or milk of choice
1 1/2 teaspoons dry active yeast
2 3/4 to 3 cups all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons granulated sugar
1 teaspoon salt
heavy pinch nutmeg
2 large eggs
1 large egg yolk
6 tablespoons unsalted butter, very soft

Pecan Cinnamon Roll Filling 

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, very soft
1/3 cup brown sugar
1 tablespoon cinnamon
3/4 cup toasted pecans, finely chopped
 

The night before: Warm the eggnog to between 100 to 110°F.  It should be warm to the touch.  Stir in the yeast and set aside for about 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, sift the flour, sugar, salt, and nutmeg into a mixing bowl. Stir to combine.

Whisk together the eggs and egg yolk, then stir them into the eggnog mixture. Pour the eggnog mixture into the dry ingredients and stir to combine.

Knead the dough by hand or with a mixer fitted with a dough hook on low speed for about 4 to 5 minutes. Once the dough begins to come together, add the butter, a tablespoon at a time, while the dough is being kneaded. Try to add as little flour as possible. When done, the dough should be soft but not sticky.

Place the dough in an oiled mixing bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Place in the refrigerator to rise overnight.
 

In the morning:Remove the dough from the refrigerator and bring it to room temperature (I place it near a heater for about 20 minutes). Remove the butter for the filling and allow to soften.

Once the dough is soft enough to roll, lightly dust your work surface with a little bit of flour and roll the dough out into a large rectangle, about 16 X 12-inches.

Spread the softened butter of the filling all over the surface of the dough, leaving about a half-inch boarder around the edges. Sprinkle with the cinnamon and sugar and pat it into the butter. Repeat with the chopped pecans, if using.

Starting at the long edge of the rectangle, carefully roll up the dough into a long log. Slide a piece of dental floss under the log until about halfway up, pull up on the strings, cross them, and pull to cut the dough in half. Continue to cut the log into 8 to 10 even pieces. If the dental floss is tricky, use a serrated knife.

Generously butter the inside of a French oven, iron skillet, or baking dish and line the bottom with parchment paper. Place the cut cinnamon rolls, cut-side up, in the bottom – leaving about a half-inch space in-between rolls. Cover with a clean kitchen towel and allow to double in size – about 3o to 45 minutes in a warm room.

Meanwhile, pre-heat the oven to 350°F. Remove the kitchen towel and bake the cinnamon rolls for about 25 to 35 minutes, or until slightly golden around the edges. Cool on a wire rack for 10 to 15 minutes as you prepare the glaze (recipe to follow). Frost and serve the cinnamon rolls while they are still warm.

Leftovers will keep covered in plastic wrap at room temperature overnight.


Orange-Vanilla Bean Cream Cheese Glaze

4 ounce cream cheese, softened
1 tablespoon unsalted butter, softened
1 ½ cups confectioner’s sugar
2 tablespoons fresh orange juice
½ teaspoon vanilla bean paste
zest of 1/2 an orange
pinch cinnamon

In a mixing bowl, stir together the cream cheese and butter until well smooth.

Gradually stir in the confectioner’s sugar and mix until incorporated.

Add in the orange juice, zest, vanilla bean paste, and cinnamon.  Stir until smooth.  Glaze should be rather thick yet spreadable.

 

Thank you to Le Creuset Canada for their participation in this post. Words and opinions are my own. 

Pumpkin Pie Layer Cake

Pumpkin Pie Layer Cake made with brown sugar PUMPKIN CAKE with nutty brown butter and graham cracker buttercream - perfect for any autumn gathering or Thanksgiving!

Pumpkin Pie Layer Cake Recipe

It's not uncommon for anyone working in the food publishing business to bake and create dishes totally out of season.  As food bloggers, we agree to making Christmas cookies in July, storing seasonal rhubarb and cranberries in the freezer just in case, and sourcing holiday decor to fit our needs.  Content that goes to print needs to be created months in advanced and even copy for online publications or sponsored posts needs to be approved weeks prior to going live. So when I actually get to bake a recipe that mirrors the season we are in, I get pretty excited.

Pumpkin Pie Layer Cake Recipe

Well, technically, I made this cake just for fun.  This is not sponsored nor part of any other project, so I suppose I could have made it at any time I wanted.  But my house is usually filled to the brim with cakes and recipes for different assignments that I don't really bake for "fun" at the moment...

Canadian Thanksgiving was a few weeks ago, and this Pumpkin Pie Layer Cake was the star of our dessert table.  I knew that I would already be trying to pawn off leftover dessert recipes from that week's testing to my fiends and family.  Sure all the desserts would taste good, but I wanted something that wasn't already sliced into or had sat around while I took photos and such in the days prior to our gathering...

Okay, so I did snap some pics of it sliced, as you can see, but you know what I mean, right?  Anyways, this Pumpkin Pie Layer Cake recipe is adapted from my first cookbook Layered.  I absolutely love this recipe and figured Canadian Thanksgiving would be the perfect occasion to recreate it.  And since Canadian Thanksgiving is at the beginning of fall and over a month before American Thanksgiving, I knew it would be the perfect cake to share with you all today as we head into peak pumpkin season!

Pumpkin Pie Layer Cake Recipe
Pumpkin Pie Layer Cake Recipe
Pumpkin Pie Layer Cake Recipe

It doesn't take much to get anyone excited about pumpkin cake.  You know any good pumpkin cake recipe will be moist, tender, and full of warming, fall spices.  This version is no exception.  I used brown sugar to add depth (trust me, it really makes a difference!) and my ration of spices (although a couple teaspoons of pumpkin spice blend would also work).

Like I always do, I had to change up the recipe from the original version (even when I wrote the original, lol).  I combined the brown butter filling and graham cracker buttercream into one!  The brown butter adds a beautiful caramel flavor to the buttercream and the graham cracker crumbs contribute texture to the otherwise tender cake and silky frosting.  As mentioned in my notes, the texture improves the second day as the crumbs soften up a bit and the pumpkin cake will stay moist and fresh for several days, so feel free to make in advanced.

Not only did my family get to enjoy this cake a couple weeks ago, this recipe is my contribution to this year's Virtual Pumpkin Party!  Now you all can make and enjoy it too!  Yay!!  What is a virtual pumpkin party you ask?  It's when a bunch of us bloggers share our favorite pumpkin recipes each year.  Or as Sara more elegantly puts it "An annual explosion and celebration of pumpkin recipes that are delivered to the internet by food bloggers from around the world on a single day in October."

Last year, I contributed this Pumpkin Creme Brûlée Cake and this Checkerboard Pumpkin Stout Cake the year before.  Be sure to head on over and check out all of this year's deliciously fall recipes!

Pumpkin Pie Layer Cake Recipe

Pumpkin Pie Layer Cake Recipe
adapted from Layered

Brown Sugar Pumpkin Cake
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
3/4 cup grapeseed oil
1 1/2 cups packed brown sugar
1/2 cup granulated sugar
4 large eggs
2 cups pumpkin puree

Pre-heat oven to 350°F. Grease and flour two 8-inch cake pans and set aside. Sift together the dry ingredients and set aside.

In the bowl of an electric stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, mix together the oil, brown sugar and granulated sugar for about 3 minutes. With the mixer on low, add in the eggs, one at a time.  Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl.

With the mixer on low, add in the dry ingredients in two additions, mixing well in between. Just as the last streaks of flour begin to disappear, stop the mixer. Add in the pumpkin and mix until combined.

Evenly distribute the batter between the two pans and bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cakes comes out clean. Let cool on a wire rack for 10 to 15 minutes before removing the cakes from their pans. Once cool, carefully slice each cake in half horizontally with a serrated knife to create four even layers.

Brown Butter Graham Frosting
3 cups unsalted butter, divided
6 large egg whites
2 cups granulated sugar
2 teaspoon vanilla extract
3/4 to 1 cup graham cracker crumbs
pinch cinnamon to taste

Place 1 ½ cups of butter in a light-colored medium saucepan. Over medium-low heat, melt then brown the butter. Turn the heat to medium-high and brown the butter, about 8 minutes. Stir the butter to keep the milk solids from sticking and burning to the bottom of the pan. When done, the butter will be very fragrant and nutty, light-medium amber in color, with dark brown bits at the bottom of the pan. Strain the browned butter with a mesh sieve into a heat-safe container and chill in the refrigerator until it reaches the same consistency as room temperature butter.

Bring the remaining 1 ½ cups butter to room temperature. Place the egg whites and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer. Gently whisk them by hand to combine. Fill a medium saucepan with a few inches of water and bring to a simmer. Place the mixer bowl on top of the saucepan with create a double-boiler. Whisking intermittently, heat the egg mixture until it reaches 160°F (70°C) on a candy thermometer. Carefully fit the mixer bowl back onto the stand mixer.

With the whisk attachment, beat the egg white mixture on high speed for 8 to 10 minutes, the mixture holds medium-stiff peaks and the outside of the bowl returns to room temperature.

Turn the mixer down to low and add in the vanilla, unsalted butter, and browned butter, a couple tablespoons at a time. Stop the mixer and swap out the whisk for the paddle attachment.

Turn the mixer to medium-high and beat until the buttercream is silky smooth, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the graham cracker crumbs and cinnamon. Mix until combined.

Assembly
pre-made pie crust
sweetened whipped cream

Place one layer of cake on a cake board or serves dish. Spread on about 1 cup of buttercream and smooth with an offset spatula. Top with the next layer of cake and repeat with remaining layers. Frost the cake with the remaining buttercream.

To decorate, pipe dollops of whipped cream and finish with a pie crust cut-out.  Serve at room temperature.

NOTES
I found that the texture of the graham crackers in the buttercream improve after about a day or so.  Store in the refrigerator overnight and let stand at room temperature about an hour before serving.

For the pie crust cut-outs, simply bake about 375 until puffed and golden (about 8 to 12 minutes). Sprinkle on some cinnamon or freshly grated nutmeg before baking.

Since the amount of whipped cream is so small, I just whisked by hand.  A great arm work-out before eating cake!!  Sweeten with a few tablespoons of sugar per cup of cream, or to taste.  Whisk until medium-stiff peaks.